Archive for August 6th, 2010

August 6th, 2010

Converse Korea: from UGC to music creation by Sarah Whitney

by Laurent François

Citizens! I found an incredible ad on Vimeo, with a song I’ve really loved (see down this post). Late 2009, Converse Korea asked its strong online community to produce UGC ads, promoting the famous sneakers. The winner had the chance to watch his creative on M-Net, a famous music TV. Interview of Sarah Whitney, composer and jazzy artist.

How come you’ve joined this UGC adventure few months ago?
It all started when a director colleague of mine, Jean Julien Pous, took part in a competition by creating an ad for Converse Korea. As the composer, I scored the ad he shot and edited.

What’s the creative idea?
Basically, Converse sets itself as a young, trendy shoe brand that wants its image to be cool, urban and cosmopolitan all at the same time.

How does it work to produce music for such a brand: did you do some planning research which could inspire your creation?
In order to compose and produce music for an ad, you must be able to rely on your sensitivity to the image first and foremost, which is how I proceeded for this Converse Korea ad. My musical culture and musical education helped enormously, since I am essentially from a jazz background, my creation resulted in a funky feel, jazzy yet urban hip-hoppish vibe.

Where can we find you online?
My work is available for viewing at www.sarahwhitney.info, where you will be able to listen to some scores I composed for various fiction films, documentaries as well watch a few commercials and music videos I took part in.

Converse Korea from Sarah Whitney on Vimeo.

August 6th, 2010

WTF in France #8 – when Hadopi lobbyists try to spam the Social Media conversations

by Laurent François

Citizens!

As you may know, there’s a strong debate about Hadopi. What is that, Hadopi?

“French Internet users could soon be asked to install spyware on their PCs that tracks their surfing habits and analyzes the applications installed on their machines in order to prevent file sharing piracy. Plans for this type of surveillance surfaced this week when a paper authored by the French Hadopi agency, which was put in place to police the French Internet and prevent copyright infringement as part of the country’s three strikes legislation, leaked online.”

Officially, Hadopi aims to prevent French users from downloading illegal files. In fact, it’s utterly more subtile and Hadopi is massively perceived as a freedom-breakthrough as internet usages are massively changing:

As consumer preferences and technology change, some people in the music industry are proposing new ways to deal with piracy. For example, PRS for Music, a royalty collection agency in Britain, proposed a levy on Internet service providers, based on the amount of pirated music that passes through their networks.

The main observers declare that this law could go at the end against creation (the logics is that P2P is now like radio used to be some decades ago: a way to discover artists, and so to generate value. I go very fast on this point…).

Well, during the last few weeks, some people discoverd on microblogging platforms like Twitter that trolls were now cyber-squatting the hadopi hashtag #hadopi, in order to artificially decrease the share of voice (and so the access to the debate).

Does it really change people’s mind? No, it just generates some more excitement and fighting spirit…