Archive for August, 2010

August 16th, 2010

WTF in France #9 – Alain Lambert quits Twitter: digital influence to produce silence

by Laurent François

Citizens!

Alain Lambert, Senator in the Upper House of Parliament and President of Orne County Council, who was Minister for the Budget and Budgetary Reform from 2002 to 2004, decided to quit Twitter.

edit:Loïc H. Rechi abstraitconcret @lilzeon en fait il a juste passé son compte en privé. translation: Alain Lambert hasn’t left, he now has a private account…

He was a very involved digital influencer, who was one of the very first politician (not to say one of the best) to understand and use Social Media. He was also involved in one of my Ogilvy project called “L’Express 3001“which aimed in early 2009 to produce with diverse digital stakeholders a special edition, thanks to a kind a lab, to explore synergies between bloggers, journalists or other types of content-makers.

On August, 15th, Alain Lambert sent 2 tweets from a Church. Problem is: a journalist who works for Ouest France, Mickael Louedec, wrote an article mentioning it. Alain Lambert, a bit angry and probably tired to manage a community of Paris-centric journalists & bloggers, decided to leave.

Few questions and insights:

  • how to manage extimacy when you’re a public person like Alain Lambert: it seems like even former Ministers don’t really position clearly themselves between what can be shared, and what must remain fully private. What a pressure…
  • how can a journalist base a whole article on a simple tweet? In this new environment, whereas you discuss as in café for upper class people, suddenly someone extracts a piece of what you say to use it for his own objective. Off is dead, definitely
  • finally, depending on your target: is it worth “tweeting” when your voters are not really into this tool? Leaving Twitter is for Alain Lambert a way to take again the lead on his narrative. To produce silence, in a sense

Digital influence is not only about engaging conversation; it’s also about managing who’s talking. And who can’t.

August 12th, 2010

The new girl: the oppos-IT Girl

by Laurent François

Citizens! According to l’Officiel de la Mode, It girls are dead: viva oppos-It girls!

“Bye-bye les filles vides, les oppos-“It girls” sont féminines mais pas féministes. Elles sont mamans, pas mamas. Elles travaillent dur, ne travaillottent pas. ” Constance Chaillet

To go fast: new girls are feminine, not feminist, they’re mummies, not mamas.

Is it a come-back to conservative styles? The new flavor for Nicolas Sarkozy female’s supporters? No.

“Dès que les choses vont mal, on se tourne vers les fondamentaux. C’est une réaction classique. A cela vient se joindre le rejet de l’anorexie et une attitude générale qui devient antimannequin jetable. Ces filles ont quelque chose en plus dans le regard et dans la tête, et on s’en rend particulièrement compte en ce moment” Alexandre Schwab, de Viva

For Alexandre Schwab, it’s just that after a crisis and a depression, we need to go back to basics and to very down the Earth messages.

Good news: in the era of Social Media, this quest of true meaning happens more and more online. Talent discovering, niche markets are the new hype. In Japan, there’s a fantastic trend around Beautiful Girls” : when stars seem to far away, we need to get some inspiration from the street. Easy, uh!?

French Connection understood it quiet well;  they wanted to destroy the image of the Parisian bitches who first look at the wallets before the eyes:

The thing is that only few brands really play with “true beauty”, the one that is invisible for eyes (lol). So to say, talent.

For instance, Garance Doré signed a limited edition for Gap. But we can obviously wonder if the brand bought a competence, an audience, or both:

A friend of mine talked about the coming mash-up between creativity, networks and stories. We should keep posted until September, 9th:

Otherwise, like French Connection, you can probably go to Married to the Mob if you like this wandering Runaway Faye, in a running movie:

RUNAWAY FAYE from The Town Pump on Vimeo.

Thanks Samy T. for the tip.

August 10th, 2010

Return on Investment or Single on Investment in Social Media?

by Laurent François

Citizens!

When it comes to Social Media, there’s most of the time this dramatic notion of Return On Investment which immediately appears.

It’s a conceptual mistake.

We’d better think in terms of “single on investment”:

  • what is at stake is the preparation of the organisation to welcome, understand and manage social web within its diverse functions. Like in a journey, a brand or a person should prepare its bags, pack-age, understand the diverse milestones which are to come
  • when you fly to a new country, you need to get some change in the local currency. For instance, if you’re an American brand, you’d better get euros soon ;). You’ll also check what are the rates, what are the prices for daily goods or services
  • you’ll also try to find “friends” or local contacts, which will help you enter more deeply in a new culture
  • you’ll get some insights about local habits
  • you’ll probably get some vaccines!

Then, only then, you start your journey. And can think of the Return.

What do you think?

August 6th, 2010

Converse Korea: from UGC to music creation by Sarah Whitney

by Laurent François

Citizens! I found an incredible ad on Vimeo, with a song I’ve really loved (see down this post). Late 2009, Converse Korea asked its strong online community to produce UGC ads, promoting the famous sneakers. The winner had the chance to watch his creative on M-Net, a famous music TV. Interview of Sarah Whitney, composer and jazzy artist.

How come you’ve joined this UGC adventure few months ago?
It all started when a director colleague of mine, Jean Julien Pous, took part in a competition by creating an ad for Converse Korea. As the composer, I scored the ad he shot and edited.

What’s the creative idea?
Basically, Converse sets itself as a young, trendy shoe brand that wants its image to be cool, urban and cosmopolitan all at the same time.

How does it work to produce music for such a brand: did you do some planning research which could inspire your creation?
In order to compose and produce music for an ad, you must be able to rely on your sensitivity to the image first and foremost, which is how I proceeded for this Converse Korea ad. My musical culture and musical education helped enormously, since I am essentially from a jazz background, my creation resulted in a funky feel, jazzy yet urban hip-hoppish vibe.

Where can we find you online?
My work is available for viewing at www.sarahwhitney.info, where you will be able to listen to some scores I composed for various fiction films, documentaries as well watch a few commercials and music videos I took part in.

Converse Korea from Sarah Whitney on Vimeo.

August 6th, 2010

WTF in France #8 – when Hadopi lobbyists try to spam the Social Media conversations

by Laurent François

Citizens!

As you may know, there’s a strong debate about Hadopi. What is that, Hadopi?

“French Internet users could soon be asked to install spyware on their PCs that tracks their surfing habits and analyzes the applications installed on their machines in order to prevent file sharing piracy. Plans for this type of surveillance surfaced this week when a paper authored by the French Hadopi agency, which was put in place to police the French Internet and prevent copyright infringement as part of the country’s three strikes legislation, leaked online.”

Officially, Hadopi aims to prevent French users from downloading illegal files. In fact, it’s utterly more subtile and Hadopi is massively perceived as a freedom-breakthrough as internet usages are massively changing:

As consumer preferences and technology change, some people in the music industry are proposing new ways to deal with piracy. For example, PRS for Music, a royalty collection agency in Britain, proposed a levy on Internet service providers, based on the amount of pirated music that passes through their networks.

The main observers declare that this law could go at the end against creation (the logics is that P2P is now like radio used to be some decades ago: a way to discover artists, and so to generate value. I go very fast on this point…).

Well, during the last few weeks, some people discoverd on microblogging platforms like Twitter that trolls were now cyber-squatting the hadopi hashtag #hadopi, in order to artificially decrease the share of voice (and so the access to the debate).

Does it really change people’s mind? No, it just generates some more excitement and fighting spirit…