Compact Conspiray: Hyundai plays with Social Media

by Laurent François

Citizens!

When it comes to Social Media, most of the time, the agencies sell 3 main principles:

  • be transparent
  • don’t create anger or mock people
  • be “linear”

And in fact, Hyundai gave us a pretty cool lesson. As Tina writes:

“We have some fun, unique online properties, like the very first faux Facebook cause, Cure Compact Crampomitosis (bit.ly/curecrampomitosis), which is presented as a tongue-in-cheek fight against the lack of leg room in compact cars, but it actually benefits a real non-profit, Americans for the Arts. When you join the cause on FB, Hyundai will donate $0.50 to Americans for the Arts. http://apps.facebook.com/causes/570191″

And that’s actually good news: a brand came to a wide audience with a value proposition, and brought us from a point A to a point B with diverse paths & episodes.

Basically, “earlier this year, Hyundai launched a series of viral pre-superbowl ads online, and these were later addressed during the game with televised ads. Thus, the “Compact Car Conspiracy” was de-mystified with the 2011 Elantra, a compact car with optimally designed interior space“.

But what’s cool is that Hyundai broke some rules whereas it was not that easy:

  • they’ve teased and “revealed” during the SuperBowl. I think it’s a risk, as if the campaign was bad, you would have a massive retaliation from the consumers. They’ve done it
  • they’ve been having some fun towards “causes” and in a sense towards this strange mood in Social Media that everything must be pink and nice. Hyundai broke this hypocrisy and organised a fake one “We stand against Compact Crampomitosis, which drives teeth into knees and buckles the legs of millions of compact car drivers every year. Please donate to give them the leg room they crave
  • they haven’t been over-promising: they’re not going to save the world with their cars, they’re just going to offer cool product benefits and services. Relevance comes with a good scope of communication. They’ve done it
  • they haven’t been “transparent”, they’ve been “authentic”, and that’s probably a great step forward: nice families always have deep secrets. It’s not because you reveal everything that you’re more honnest. Hyundai has been coherent, and keeps rocking. Love it. Look at this video (March 2011):

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