Archive for ‘buzz’

March 19th, 2012

How to set up an alert to monitor a potential crisis on Pinterest?

by Laurent François

It’s a fact: it’s very urgent for brand strategists to start monitoring what’s happening on Pinterest, to forecast potential crisis, as they already do thanks to monitoring tools like Radian6 or eCairn.

Most of the big digital bad buzz & crisis could now start on Pinterest: using brand images and transforming them to denunciate or attack them is already a classic tool that digital activists use.

But making it start via Pinterest could be extremely powerful: it could maximize the visual culture lure thanks to the “repin and linking” effect. As it’s not yet followed by search engines, it could impact citizens’ minds and remaining more silent on Google.

The main problem at this stage is that you cannot easily follow any “pinterest feed”, so it’s complicated to shape a crisis alert, for instance on a reader. But Ann Smarty gave us some clues on Mashable:she told us how to Track a website’s Content on Pinterest.

It can be great, as it’s already a first part of the problem: identifying brand detractors or promoters.

 

We’ve then hacked her demonstration, not to follow only our own contents, but to generate a feed to follow a potential risk. We’ve also used Feed 43, and we’ve done it for the International Monetary Fund (IMF). So here’s the way it works:

We’ve specified a query we’ve done on Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/search/?q=IMF . We’ve left it pretty wide, as we wanted to get ALL contents about IMF.

You then need to copy/paste this code on Feed 43:

Item (repeatable) Search Pattern*: [?]
<a href=”http://pinterest.com/pin/{%}”>{*}
<p>{%}</p>{*}
<a href=”{%}” title=”{%}”>{*}

Item Title Template
{%2}

Item Link Template*:
http://pinterest.com/pin/{%1}

Item Content Template
Shared by <a href=”{%3}”>{%4}</a><p>

 

You now can add this feed to any monitoring tool, like Radian6 for instance. (and we’re sorry if I were IMF, I would definitely have a look right here)

April 28th, 2011

Why Social Media ideas are still complicated to widespread in Europe

by Laurent François

We had a great conversation 2 days ago @ ESCP Europe with some students, who wanted to know if it was more relevant to implement their start-ups in France, or more generally in Europe, or to directly move to the US.

Some constraints are obvious in Europe, and the main difficulty is…leveraging critical mass:

  • you have more than 20 languages in the European Union stricto sensu
    – it means that if there’s one EU citizenship, you have hundreds of local cultures you need to handle as an entrepreneur
    – you not only need to translate your solution but also understand the local expectations
    – people can’t easily share ideas and games through conversations, as they don’t speak all English, for instance
  • there’s already a wide diversity of start-ups: how to be original?
  • there are legal constraints, thus

But hey, socializers, come on! 3 arguments to answer:

  • if it was all about getting enough people to be reached, just go in advertising, not marketing: many products are good for very few people: the critical mass to achieve can be a very low number, depending on your business
  • think “business”, not “social”: what do you want to sell, and to whom?
  • the local differences are also business opportunities: not many people know how to manage different groups of people, even in plain English: it’s time to grow it

Remember: Social Media is a practice; what are your core competences? who are the public you want to reach? What’s the value proposition?

 

Once you’ve solved that, you don’t care where you are: there are still people talking to other people. Be pervasive; and creative

 

January 22nd, 2011

Japanese people and Twitter: the social gap

by Laurent François

Citizens

2 news which can be faced.

The first one I’ve read: the great Fondapol study on the worldwide youth. Insights are crucial:

Japanese youths are overwhelmingly dissatisfied with the general situation in their country (75%), and while three-quarters of the world’s youths claim to be at least satisfied with their personal lives, it is still dissatisfaction which prevails (51%) among the Japanese. Nothing seems to mitigate this pessimism: young Japanese are just as discontent with their finances (74%) as they are with their work (60%). Only 32% of them believe they will have a good job in the future, as compared to an overall mean of 70%. The way they rank their family and friends is even more troubling. Although the world’s youths are satisfied with their family circle (85%), only 69% of the Japanese share their opinion. Similarly, although 78% are satisfied with their circle of friends, only 62% of the Japanese agree. They reject their era: a clear majority (61%) of the Japanese indicate that they are not satisfied with
the age in which they live, even though 59% of the world’s youths are satisfied with it.

On the other side, everybody seemes pretty impressed by the twitter stats  (read Techcrunch) of the Japanese for New Year’s Eve.

The problem is that it has not much to do with the explosion of an amplified social link.

  • it is true that you can express much more in 140 signs in Japanese than in any Latin language (kanjis have deeper sense)
  • but Twitter is essentially used by fans who want to express their love to a J-Pop Band
    During the year, TV news and drama featured Twitter, and it gained many high profile users, including ex-Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama. There were also about 100 books published with “Twitter” in the title.
  • Only 3,6% of the Japanese accounts display the real names of the people (because of the cultural reluctance to not use alias…)
  • Japanese users declare that they only follow 51% of close-friends. Because they’ve been pushed to use it not through implicit networks (their friends, for instance to use Twitter as SMS tool) but by media

So to say: you can have a social situation close to anomie and freakily use Social Media: it’s not a good or bad news on your society. Brands should consider this point when it comes to digital or contact strategy: people they try to outreach are not all happy-face, supra-socializers. They are real people with real troubleS.

September 17th, 2010

Why Diaspora project could work

by Laurent François

Citizens! I had a conversation this week around net neutrality and some French entrepreneurs around the table did not believe at all that Diaspora could defeat the “big” Facebook. Well, big, if you think twice, you can easily remember it’s a younger network than my own studies period, so as “evidences of relevance” are not so…evident.

Moreoever, I like the MySpace example and the Facebook one. In the early ages of Facebook, no one could think there’d be a massive translation from a network to another. It was in a sense pretty easy in the MySpace to Facebook in France, as MySpace was mostly perceived as an entertainment platform for us against a “friend management system” for Facebook. Different usages, so as a market gap that was filled. Something absolutely different in the US where MySpace was an interpersonal network, a true Social Network on your whole life. And it finally happened: people moved to Facebook, or added Facebook to their digital identity. And Facebook & MySpace can now be synchronized.

For Diaspora, the challenge is big: be able to mobilize general public to move to is platform, against the Facebook one. Something complicated as every mobile device providers pre-install Facebook or Twitter.

But.

There’s been a wide PR coverage about new Facebook competitor. Every single news magazine diffused interviews, opinions, articles, about this new player. There’s been a great mobilization online, from diverse communities: the founders are not just “geek” people, they’re also like us: citizens, fed up with Facebook Califorinia laws. Fed up with this Teddy Boy called Mark Zuckerberg who wants to control our social graph.

There’s obviously an explicit expectation. And when it comes to social networks, explicit networks play a great role. For instance, if Viadeo, the French professional network, worked so well, it’s because during the summer of its launch, the salesmen & founders called their C+ friends to join the platform. For explicit reasons. They transferred their whole address books. Then they added or made implicit networks play the prescription mechanism on its own. On a daily basis, anytime I meet an interesting professional contact, based on my experience, I can decide to explicitely add someone.

On Diaspora, there’s both an explicit reason to join, and an implicit mechanism which can lead to a massive interest from the general public.

  • there’s been an engagement program towards the traditional Key opinion leaders & towards disruptive ones like bloggers
  • there’s a clear value proposition: a Facebook without Facebook Manichean attitude
  • there’s a tricky tactics: not directly opposing Facebook to Diaspora (either join us either leave us) but progressively demonstrating why it’d be better

There are strong business opportunities for developers to join Diaspora model, as Diaspora released today its source:

  • you can be freed from Apple or Facebook constraints
  • you can also get enough audience to make your great service worth
  • you can go directly to your relevant public
  • you can avoid legal issues therefore money waste on privacy questions

For me, as a citizen-consumer, I see many interests:

  • I don’t lose my social capital if I move to Diaspora
  • I can probably get great applications & services, and to be fair, I don’t give a shit if it’s on Facebook or else, if it works on my smartphone and if I can get access to all the resources I need
  • It’s a manifesto for a more fair market. And I like fair & true view principles

Maybe I’m too Android-minded. Maybe.

August 21st, 2010

WTF in France #11 – René la Taupe

by Laurent François

Citizens!

There’s a very untypical musician who has just passed Shakira as number 1 in the digital charts in France: René la Taupe.

This dramatically obsessing cartoon is a mobile phone ringtone, conceived by Fox Mobile Group studios. A lot of cash-flow to come for the company…

It’s been viewed 5 million times for the last 2 months on YouTube. According to the author, Séverine Thomazo, who was interviewed by France Soir, she only spent 7 minutes for fun writing the lyrics (and we understand why).

René la Taupe also made fun of the French soccer team, adapting its “Mignon Mignon” hit to the South Africa World Cup.

Here’s the Facebook Community Page for René la Taupe.

A very binarian communication strategy that works:

  • massive TV ads
  • stupid but funny character which created some empathy online
  • diverse meme as you’ll see on Facebook & YouTube

French are nice persons, not that arrogant after all 😀