Posts tagged ‘communication’

December 6th, 2010

Do advertisers need mobile marketing agencies in a digital world?

by Laurent François

Citizens!

When Patrick Lord, Founder of mobile advertising company Adremixer, came to me with this question:

Do advertisers need mobile marketing agencies in a digital world?

I was of course very happy to spend some times, discussing about my Ogilvy experience and what I felt would be the next big move.

You can read the whole report right here; the definition of Mobile Marketing that is used in the report is the MMA one:

“a set of practices that enables organizations to communicate and engage with their audience in an interactive and relevant manner through any mobile device or network.”

My point of view (briefly): mobile marketing is just a leverage at this stage (even in less than a decade, our digital self will be fully mobile, so as Mobile marketing will also be … marketing at all). It’s not yet mainstream.

Agencies need to think first in terms of the story to tell, not about the technology. Mobile technology is simply another leverage that may or may not be used to help tell that story. Sometimes it’s the central hub of the campaign, because it’s the most interesting place to play in with consumers. Sometimes it’s not justified at all.

But anyhow, go and read it. And I’d be glad to share some points of views around it!

November 21st, 2010

Social Media project has failed

by Laurent François

15 years ago, we said that the web could be this fantastic playground in which social relationships among people could free their souls & projects. A place in with the wisdom of crowds could help us shape all the criteria of success to optimize our daily lives, moreoever for our children.

Well, this project has to a certain extent failed.

4 pessimistic reasons, all linked to the building of an history (in French; “historicité”), to confirm this idea

  • the access to archives of conversations is dramatically complicated for any citizen. Here and there, you can find digital footprints, for instance in 90s-newsgroups. Nonetheless, in the 90s, the social web has first been developped on economical reasons, not through vertuous ones. During this decade, we should have implemented “curators” in order to organise the web. Some might say that thanks to monitoring solutions, it’s now possible to follow insights through the time. Maybe. But how many solutions keep more than 6 months of conversations? Very few, as this effort has a huge cost. Congrats to all the universitarians and people trying to build these histories. But we’ve lost decades.
  • How many articles, written by professionals (press, thinkers etc.) link to the past? How many media now do have the capabilities to produce long-term files? Not a lot. There should be people dedicated to these objectifs within their organizations; the problem is that the business model was not made on that but on fast news. Once again, we’ve lost decades
  • How many new ideas have been propagated on stage, in front of a huge mass of people? This nice democratic idea in which a topic or a guy could be elected by chance, and that could have an impact, a debate? In real life, you can be picked in a jury, for law. In Social Media, it’s rare to find people promoting by pure chance new talents or ideas. Actors’ strategy…Decades lost
  • How many iconoclast ideas have been perennial, in political fields, for instance? How many of them did pass the very conservative filters, even when they seem to be “cool”?

The Social Media project has to a certain extent failed: it’s now time to go back to sense & goals; in order to not only ask ourselves “who benefits from crime ?” but “why do we communicated?”.



June 8th, 2010

Context is sometimes more important than the product

by Laurent François

Citizens!

A quick note mentioning a very funny but efficient campaign in Japan:

“Yahoo Japan is reporting on the tactics of Odawara City to get people interested in the forthcoming summer elections.

Preparing a fairly modest 200 rolls, the city’s election organizers has been distributing the toilet paper to Odawara restaurants, along with posters and special drinks coasters..”

This tactics could be amplified in Social Media; context is probably even more important than the product itself. Depending on the affinity, marketers could try to find what fits more to expectations & actions of final publics.

That’s fair: why not use an important moment like sitting in a bathroom to display key messages to your final public?

Next time: a twitter feed on the roll?

Ha – Ha – Ha